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Old 03-29-2018, 01:48 PM   #1
seeking1
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Default Egalitarianism Vs. Complementarianism

So, I do realize that the local church was kind of hard on sisters, depending on the locality, it was harder for some sisters than others. However this is just something that I have really been wrestling with lately. Regarding women pastors my thoughts have always been along the lines of "I don't think that it's biblical but, meh, who cares". However, since I've been attending a church that has two women pastors (the lead pastor is a male) I have noticed that it seems like most of the activity in the congregation is dominated by women. So, after digging into it a little further, seeing what the Word says and reading various papers that support both viewpoints it really seems like it takes some theological "maneuvering", to support the position of women pastors. I would love to hear some of your thoughts on this.
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Old 03-29-2018, 04:29 PM   #2
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Default Re: Egalitarianism Vs. Complementarianism

Hi seeking1,

I do not believe the pastoral system is according to the Scriptures. Therefore, anything that I would add would be irrelevant to your question.

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Old 03-29-2018, 04:44 PM   #3
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Default Re: Egalitarianism Vs. Complementarianism

Pastors are shepherds of the flock. Both the OT and NT scriptures are filled with verses on pastor / shepherds.

Hi Drake, show me a verse about LC "Full-Timers?"

What Drake really said was, "I do not believe the LSM 'Full-Timers' system is according to the Scriptures."
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Old 03-29-2018, 05:15 PM   #4
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Default Re: Egalitarianism Vs. Complementarianism

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Hi seeking1,

I do not believe the pastoral system is according to the Scriptures. Therefore, anything that I would add would be irrelevant to your question.

Drake
I get your point Drake but since leaving the local church I have not found an assembly that really lines up with what the Lord has shown me. That said, I have been intentional about just being around other believers (that aren't blatantly heretical) and having my kids around other believers while overlooking doctrinal differences or at least I am trying to, hence this thread.
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Old 03-29-2018, 04:51 PM   #5
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Default Re: Egalitarianism Vs. Complementarianism

Personally I lean towards "Complementarianism" in the body of Christ. For example, I have never seen brothers serve in the nursery, but that doesn't mean it could never happen.

I Corinthians shows us that the members of His body do not all have the same gifts. That doesn't mean that the sisters are "more equal" than the brothers, it just means that not every member is gifted the same way.
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Old 03-29-2018, 05:23 PM   #6
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Hi Ohio,

Yeah, that seems to be where I'm at and I'm having a hard time justifying anything else. What troubles me is that the argument for egalitarians employs some of the same reasoning used by the pro gay marriage bunch.
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Old 03-29-2018, 07:28 PM   #7
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Default Re: Egalitarianism Vs. Complementarianism

Seeking1,

What kind of theological "maneuvering"?

Can we agree on these definitions?

Christian egalitarianism (derived from the French word égal, meaning equal or level), also known as biblical equality, is a Christian form of egalitarianism. It holds that all human persons are created equally in God's sight—equal in fundamental worth and moral status. This view does not just apply to gender, but to religion, skin colour and any other differences between individuals. It does not imply that all have equal skills, abilities, interests, or physiological or genetic traits. Christian egalitarianism holds that all people are equal before God and in Christ; have equal responsibility to use their gifts and obey their calling to the glory of God; and are called to roles and ministries without regard to class, gender, or race.

Complementarianism is a theological view held by some in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam,[1] that men and women have different but complementary roles and responsibilities in marriage, family life, religious leadership, and elsewhere. The word "complementary" and its cognates are currently used[2] to denote this view. For some Christians whose complementarian view is biblically-prescribed, these separate roles preclude women from specific functions of ministry within the community.[3][4] Though women may be precluded from certain roles and ministries they are held to be equal in moral value and of equal status. The phrase used to describe this is 'Ontologically equal, Functionally different'.[5]

Complementarians assign primary headship roles to men and support roles to women—based on their interpretation of certain biblical passages. One of the precepts of complementarianism is that while women may assist in the decision-making process, the ultimate authority for the decision is the purview of the male in marriage, courtship, and in the polity of churches subscribing to this view.

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Old 03-29-2018, 08:09 PM   #8
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Thanks for that Nell. Concerning women, Paul seems to be of the egalitarian sort :

Rom 16:7* Salute Andronicus and Junia, my kinsmen, and my fellowprisoners, who are of note among the apostles, who also were in Christ before me.*
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Old 03-30-2018, 08:15 AM   #9
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Default Re: Egalitarianism Vs. Complementarianism

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Seeking1,

What kind of theological "maneuvering"?

Can we agree on these definitions?

Christian egalitarianism (derived from the French word égal, meaning equal or level), also known as biblical equality, is a Christian form of egalitarianism. It holds that all human persons are created equally in God's sight—equal in fundamental worth and moral status. This view does not just apply to gender, but to religion, skin colour and any other differences between individuals. It does not imply that all have equal skills, abilities, interests, or physiological or genetic traits. Christian egalitarianism holds that all people are equal before God and in Christ; have equal responsibility to use their gifts and obey their calling to the glory of God; and are called to roles and ministries without regard to class, gender, or race.

Complementarianism is a theological view held by some in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam,[1] that men and women have different but complementary roles and responsibilities in marriage, family life, religious leadership, and elsewhere. The word "complementary" and its cognates are currently used[2] to denote this view. For some Christians whose complementarian view is biblically-prescribed, these separate roles preclude women from specific functions of ministry within the community.[3][4] Though women may be precluded from certain roles and ministries they are held to be equal in moral value and of equal status. The phrase used to describe this is 'Ontologically equal, Functionally different'.[5]

Complementarians assign primary headship roles to men and support roles to women—based on their interpretation of certain biblical passages. One of the precepts of complementarianism is that while women may assist in the decision-making process, the ultimate authority for the decision is the purview of the male in marriage, courtship, and in the polity of churches subscribing to this view.

Nell
So, one example of what I think is "maneuvering" can be found in this excerpt from the Junia Project, (the full article can be found here: https://juniaproject.com/defusing-1-timothy-212-bomb/ )where the author attempts to pick apart Paul's intent in 1Tim 2:12 however, their effort pretty much falls flat with what seems to be all smoke and no fire.

"Before we conclude that this passage is “clear” we must consider the limitations of our English translations. The most problematic issue is the rendering of the verb authentein as authority. This unusual Greek verb is found only once in scripture and rarely in extrabiblical texts, where it is usually associated with aggression. Authentein is translated as “domineer” in the Latin Vulgate and New English Bible and as “usurp authority” in the Geneva and King James Bibles.

A study of Paul’s letters shows that he regularly used a form of the Greek “exousia” when referring to the use of authority in the church (see 1 Cor 6:12, 7:4, 1 Cor 6:12, 7:4, 9:4-6, 9:12, 11:10, 2 Cor 2:8, 10:8, 13:10, Col. 1:13, 2 Thess 3:12, Rom 6:15, 9:21). So it is strange that some modern versions translate this simply as “authority”. Considering the context, it is likely that Paul was objecting to something other than the legitimate use of authority in 1 Timothy 2:12. (More on authentein here, and see a more recent follow-up post here.)

There is also the possibility that the verb didaskein (to teach) is linked here to the verb authentein in what is called a hendiadys (two words joined by a conjunction to make a single point). “Don’t eat and run” would be a modern example. So a better interpretation might be “don’t teach in a domineering way”.

Additionally, the grammar in this passage changes abruptly from the plural “women” in verses 9 & 10 to “a woman” in verses 11-15. Then it changes back to “women” in the next chapter, suggesting that Paul had a specific woman in mind, perhaps one that Timothy had written to him about. Furthermore, some scholars believe “I don’t permit” could also be accurately translated as “I am not currently permitting”. So while these verses are often used to defend male-only leadership, current scholarship suggests that the passage is anything BUT clear on the issue."


Regarding the definitions, I would not agree on those definitions. May I ask where you found them? The author is clearly being more charitable to Egalitarianism. The invocation of race is troublesome given that this is also a tactic used by the LGBT movement in an attempt to ride the coat tails of racial discrimination in order to promote their agenda. Furthermore, the definition of Egalitarianism could also be used to define complementarianism which also holds that "all people are equal before God and in Christ; have equal responsibility to use their gifts and obey their calling to the glory of God; and are called to roles and ministries without regard to class, gender, or race." Complementarians just maintain that God, as indicated by the Scriptures, has not called women to be in ministries that place them in authority over adult men. Also, the author injects Judaism and Islam into the definition of "Christian Egalitarianism", which seems like an attempt at projecting legalistic patriarchal characteristics onto that view point.
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Old 03-30-2018, 09:17 AM   #10
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Default Re: Egalitarianism Vs. Complementarianism

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So, one example of what I think is "maneuvering" can be found in this excerpt from the Junia Project, (the full article can be found here: https://juniaproject.com/defusing-1-timothy-212-bomb/ )
Thanks for that, btw. I've been involved with the Church of Christ (Cambellites) here locally. They take these verses in Timothy very seriously. So I emailed the link to them. One of them is a outspoken CoC female, the other is a CoC preacher for over 50 years. Our discussions should be lively.

So seeking1, so far I don't know you from Adam's cat. But from your post I gather some things about your position on the egalitarian/complementarian question.

I gather that, you don't seem to be too fond of egalitarianism. Cuz to you it doesn't strike you as true to Timothy.

Also, I gather that you're not fond of exegesis of scripture. Like taking a look at the Greek text, context, and so forth and so on.

It also stands out that LGBTQ is anathema to you. I doubt that you'll ever be egalitarian with them.

And you seem too to be concerned about being egalitarian with race, Judaism, and Islam.

Please correct me if I'm wrong about any of this. But if I'm not, tell me please, just who are you egalitarian with?
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Old 03-30-2018, 09:54 AM   #11
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Geeez Harold, how many rabbit holes can you fit into one post? Give seeking1 one a break, will ya? His opening post was pretty straight forward. If you want to address that then go for it.

It's good Friday....so be good.
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Old 03-30-2018, 12:02 PM   #12
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Geeez Harold, how many rabbit holes can you fit into one post? Give seeking1 one a break, will ya? His opening post was pretty straight forward. If you want to address that then go for it.

It's good Friday....so be good.
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My bad. Sorry seeking1. I guess I should hold any questions until I give you the chance to reveal your position in its entirety.

Sorry again brother, or sister (I don't know yet). Consider me just an idiot.

Happy Good Friday ... if you celebrate it.
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Old 03-30-2018, 10:28 PM   #13
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...Regarding the definitions, I would not agree on those definitions. May I ask where you found them? ...
The definitions are Wikipedia...at least they are a place to start.
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Old 03-29-2018, 08:28 PM   #14
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So, I do realize that the local church was kind of hard on sisters, depending on the locality, it was harder for some sisters than others. However this is just something that I have really been wrestling with lately. Regarding women pastors my thoughts have always been along the lines of "I don't think that it's biblical but, meh, who cares". However, since I've been attending a church that has two women pastors (the lead pastor is a male) I have noticed that it seems like most of the activity in the congregation is dominated by women. So, after digging into it a little further, seeing what the Word says and reading various papers that support both viewpoints it really seems like it takes some theological "maneuvering", to support the position of women pastors. I would love to hear some of your thoughts on this.
Your view matches that of top theologians in the field such as Daniel B. Wallace who states that it requires exegetical gymnastics to arrive at an egalitarian conclusion.

He has written extensively about this such as here:

https://bible.org/article/some-refle...agmatic-issues

What is interesting about him is that personally he is egalitarian but professionally as an expert in NT Greek, he is complementarian and does not believe that the bible supports an egalitarian position.

As an example of the "exegetical gymnastics" Wallace talks about, consider this passage:

Wives, submit to your husbands, as is fitting in the Lord. Husbands, love your wives, and do not be harsh with them. Children, obey your parents in everything, for this pleases the Lord. Fathers, do not provoke your children, lest they become discouraged. (Colossians 3:18–21).

Now egalitarians argue that both wives and husbands must submit to each other. Even though it only mentions wives submitting to husbands in this verse, they draw from a verse elsewhere in scripture which says "submit to one another". This is one "gymnastical jump". The second gymastical jump is regarding the part about children obeying parents. If one reads the text as if both wives and husbands submit to each other, then should parents also obey their children?? This cannot be.

If we add to this discussion that historically men have led the church, as supported by all major denominations until only in modern times, the egalitarian position is on a shallow ground of sand.

I personally believe that egalitarianism is a sign of degradation in the church. It is no coincidence that such a movement took hold in the church, around the same time as the LGBT and feminist movements in the 70's/80's. When I was in denominations in the 70's/80's, I observed as the traditional role of the man in the family, in society and in the church was being eroded bit by bit.

Thanks to the Reformation, the bible was made available to everyone in the common language, since the 1500/1600's. Why has it taken so long for the egalitarians to come into the church, if the teaching is truly in the Bible? I believe the teaching is not obvious in the bible, and the movement has come about from influence of the world on the church. If egalitarianism was the teaching of the bible, we surely would have seen it adopted early in the Reformation, in the 1700's for example.

The Lord showed me that this was the doing of the anti-Christ, and not from Him. All this is done under the guise of being modern and "relevance to todays culture". Worse, compromising with the world, as churches are afraid to be unpopular with the status quo in Western society. It is not so in Eastern countries, which are appalled at the acceptance of gay marriage in the West and erosion of family values and the father figure as the head of the family and the church.
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Old 03-29-2018, 09:11 PM   #15
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I love the body of Christ. I have a Nazarene friend who is OK with women pastors, but would never touch an adult beverage; and several reformed friends that brew their own, but could never accept a woman elder or pastor.
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Old 03-30-2018, 05:05 PM   #16
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I love the body of Christ. I have a Nazarene friend who is OK with women pastors, but would never touch an adult beverage; and several reformed friends that brew their own, but could never accept a woman elder or pastor.
The scripture is more permissive of a good home brew than female church leaders.
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Old 03-30-2018, 05:08 PM   #17
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I think that most people would be ok if an oil rig or construction site was not in charge by a woman. But they don't see that the church is a spiritual construction site - men are just more capable of church leadership and hard work. That's why men have wide shoulders to bear the burden and women don't. Some women pastors I know of just couldn't do the work without a supportive husband beside them. Others cut their hair short and try to give a male persona.
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Old 03-30-2018, 08:19 PM   #18
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The scripture is more permissive of a good home brew than female church leaders.
That is absurd. Paul said an elder needed to be "the husband of one wife". That means, if you select an elder according to the scripture you will get both a brother and a sister. Everyone with any experience in the church at all knows that the wife of an elder is a "church leader".
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Old 03-31-2018, 04:05 AM   #19
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That is absurd. Paul said an elder needed to be "the husband of one wife". That means, if you select an elder according to the scripture you will get both a brother and a sister. Everyone with any experience in the church at all knows that the wife of an elder is a "church leader".
Must an elder also have a plurality of children? 1 tim 3.4. This cannot be the intended meaning. The meaning is that the elder must have good character and not a string of divorced and remarriages. I disagree with your interpretation also because celibacy was highly valued in early church leadership. If being married was a requirement we dont see it practiced.

Its true that there are more verses supporting the drinking of wine than female elders. Also...Jesus drank alcohol but never appointed a female disciple.
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Old 03-29-2018, 10:39 PM   #20
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Your view matches that of top theologians in the field such as Daniel B. Wallace who states that it requires exegetical gymnastics to arrive at an egalitarian conclusion.

He has written extensively about this such as here:

https://bible.org/article/some-refle...agmatic-issues

What is interesting about him is that personally he is egalitarian but professionally as an expert in NT Greek, he is complementarian and does not believe that the bible supports an egalitarian position.
If he's such a New Testament expert, then he should be honest about discrepancies in the NT manuscripts concern women, and their 'scripturely' demanded silence.

I can't help but think Wallace, as a professor at Dallas Theological Seminary, knows where his bread is buttered, and so has to comply with their conservative patriarchal views ... that essentially reflects back to caveman day type views.

That women are are lesser vessels is quite universal across cultures, religions, and times. Particularly among monotheist religions.

Face it, men, as physically stronger, need to subjugate women because women have better brain computers ; and because all human life come from them.

Wallace clearly supports the manly view that prolly does go back to caveman days.
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Old 04-03-2018, 07:52 PM   #21
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For anyone that is interested, here is a video of a pastor answering the "Can women be pastors?" question. I have watched, probably 2 dozen videos on the subject but I really liked how this guy (who I had never heard of) laid it out.

https://youtu.be/3oOnPVunV8I
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Old 04-04-2018, 10:17 AM   #22
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For anyone that is interested, here is a video of a pastor answering the "Can women be pastors?" question. I have watched, probably 2 dozen videos on the subject but I really liked how this guy (who I had never heard of) laid it out.

https://youtu.be/3oOnPVunV8I
He really dives deep into head covering (36 minutes) but skims over the aspect of a woman being an elder or pastor.

His key verse concerning church leadership is that Adam was created first and was not deceived, Eve was created second and fell into transgression. It seems to me that women have a key weakness that men don't have, they are the comely members and drop their defenses when anyone appreciates their comeliness. They also have an aversion to being "ugly". Men on the other hand are not the comely members and do not have the same aversion to being "ugly" when necessary.

I also appreciated the lengthy discussion on the biblical hierarchy. Christ -- head of man -- Man head of woman -- woman head of child.

So what happens when a man becomes a pastor, is his mother still his head?

He ties this into "the woman will be saved through childbearing". He makes an interesting point, she is not saved from hell, she is saved from second place. So then, the hierarchy is not a straight line, it is a circle.

The woman doesn't understand why she is "second place" to the man, but learns at home by raising children and listening to the children with the same questions as to why they are second place to the mom.

Also, this matter of head covering, it applies to everyone. Everyone has their head covered. Elders do not have the authority to "hire and fire" or to "give raises" or to assign work. It is Jesus who saves, Jesus who will reward us at His throne and Jesus who calls. Elders will also be rewarded or punished at the throne, they also need the Lord's salvation, and they also are called by the Lord.

He also connects the verse in 1Cor about Paul not permitting a woman to speak in the meeting with the context about speaking in tongues. It is not a overarching rule but rather specific to the exercise of tongues during a church meeting.

Finally, he points out again and again that these gender specific roles in the NT are so that we would raise our family well.
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Old 04-04-2018, 10:10 PM   #23
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...Adam was created first and was not deceived..
So, which is worse, willful sin or sinning because you were deceived? The serpent deceived the woman, but the man knew what he was doing was sin, but he did it anyway. Somehow not being deceived seems to be a “badge of honor” for a man, but that could only mean he acted willfully. How is that a good thing?
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Old 04-05-2018, 05:34 AM   #24
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So, which is worse, willful sin or sinning because you were deceived? The serpent deceived the woman, but the man knew what he was doing was sin, but he did it anyway. Somehow not being deceived seems to be a “badge of honor” for a man, but that could only mean he acted willfully. How is that a good thing?
Good point. Seems to me they both were deceived. Adam, however, heard from God first-hand.
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Old 04-05-2018, 09:36 AM   #25
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So, which is worse, willful sin or sinning because you were deceived? The serpent deceived the woman, but the man knew what he was doing was sin, but he did it anyway. Somehow not being deceived seems to be a “badge of honor” for a man, but that could only mean he acted willfully. How is that a good thing?
The post you are quoting from was a summary of the positions taken from the youtube video that seeking1 referenced. Since I have summed up 45 minute video with a very brief post I think it would be more fair to actually listen to his video and then discuss what he said. In my post I made it clear that this is a key verse to the position he takes.

That said I do think this is a very interesting verse to discuss, it is crucial to the discussion (I agree with the pastor on that point, that this verse is critical) and I would like to be involved in a discussion on it. However, I am not interested in "which is worse". Instead, I believe this event reveals strengths and weaknesses of both men and women, as a result it is important in determining what roles we are each more suited to.
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Old 04-06-2018, 12:46 AM   #26
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Scripture is fairly clear that only the woman was deceived. Adam was not deceived and ate the fruit knowing that it was a sin (1 Tim 2:14). Adam's sin was willful, and greater than the woman's - for this reason death came through Adam directly (Romans 5:12), not Eve.

God declared that the one who had the greater sin (the man) would have the greater responsibility in the church. This may seem unfair as the one who committed the least sin should have preference but God does not make decisions in this way - God makes decisions based on His infinite wisdom.

I believe it is this way for some reasons:

Adam's sin was worse, so God had more to forgive the man, and therefore God showed more grace and love to Adam than Eve (Luke 7:47).

The ability to fall into error without knowing it (deceived) is potentially worse than willful error in regards to leadership. If the leader is deceived then it is blind leading the blind. But if the leader knows their sin, then at least they know. Even though willful sin is worse, it is easier to correct tha deception.

As an example, it is really hard to correct someone who doesn't know they have sinned or even what the concept of sin is, like a small child or an animal. If you correct them once, they will probably repeat their mistake.

But an adult who has full faculty of reason is potentially easier for God to correct and deal with, learn from their lesson and move forward. An example is David and Bathsheba - this was a willful sin on the part of David to kill her husband and it seems he started the affair, but Bathsheba was probably deceived or coerced by David into committing sin but she also shares some of the blame for not being faithful to her husband. For this reason David gets the harsher punishment and Bathsheba does not seem to be punished.
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Old 11-30-2018, 05:03 AM   #27
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Default Re: Egalitarianism Vs. Complementarianism

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So, I do realize that the local church was kind of hard on sisters, depending on the locality, it was harder for some sisters than others..
The local church was initially egalitarian with sisters. Watchman Nee used them extensively as a stepping-stone to power. Eventually they were no longer needed, and seen as a threat to the "authority" of men, and were discarded. Back to the nursery they went.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FaithSavesKeswick
In 1935 Nee became involved with Pentecostalism through Miss Elizabeth Fischbacher of the China Inland Mission.[1665] He had “overcome his reservations about women preachers sufficiently to attend her meetings,” and, in line with his Keswick continuationism, “acknowledged the Holy Spirit’s . . . gifts to the church of healing and of speaking with and interpretation of tongues.”[1666] Nee “found peace and spiritual blessing in her message and some experiences associated with her Pentecostal theology.”[1667] Miss Fischbacher, who translated various items for the Little Flock into English,[1668] accompanied Nee to the 1938 Keswick convention;[1669] the addresses in Nee’s The Normal Christian Life were delivered on this trip to the West.[1670]
Peace Wang and Ruth Lee were also Nee's closest 'senior' co-workers. Eventually, though, egalitarianism served its purpose - the acquisition of temporal, earthly power - then it was formally rejected. Like in the book, "Animal Farm". To get rid of the current ruling class, "we are all equal"; to establish a new ruling class, "but some of us are a bit more equal than others".

http://faithsaves.net/sanctification...higher-life-3/

Of course, this is just hypothesis, suggested by the facts. It may be that the "truth" of the local church and egalitarianism is different. I'm just writing what I see, and what it suggests to me. It may suggest something else, to other readers.
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Old 11-30-2018, 09:05 AM   #28
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Interesting link aron, do you know who wrote this? What is their agenda?

I find it amazing how the Recovery can use people, and then discard them. And vice versa. The Keswick Convention of T.A. Sparks was always held in high regard by Lee.

Look at these conclusions in the piece you linked. They do seem quite extreme. Perhaps our scholar Drake can provide needed insight.
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Applications from the Life and Teachings of Watchman Nee

The writings of Watchman Nee are extremely dangerous and unreliable. Those of Nee’s successor, Witness Lee, are even worse.[1810] Believers should be warned against them, not encouraged to read them. They would be better used to kindle a fire in a wood stove than to kindle a fire for God in a believer’s soul—and they have been an instrument to lead many to the everlasting fires of hell.

Do you want your church to reject the true God and join a modalistic cult that denies the gospel, banishes believers to a Protestant purgatory, confuses and hinders Biblical sanctification, and rejects the study of Scripture for demonically produced mystical experiences? Then acquire Watchman Nee’s writings and study them carefully, for by the study of his writings countless people have been brought into exactly this sort of apostasy.

Vast numbers in China have rejected Christianity for the Church of the Recovery, and in the United States and elsewhere in the world the cult of Nee and Lee proselytizes by spreading the teachings and writings of their false prophets to as many in Christendom as show any interest. Is rejecting Jehovah for idolatry an intolerable and infinite evil? Then have nothing to do with Watchman Nee and Witness Lee, for they were not God’s watchmen, nor true witnesses to Him.

The abominable heresies of Watchman Nee and Witness Lee illustrate where the Keswick continuationism can lead—their cult is Keswick theology gone to seed. The rejection of grammatical-historical exegesis and literal interpretation for mystical and experiential hermeneutics fundamentally undergirds Keswick, Pentecostal, and Church of the Recovery doctrine; all these movements fall away, and classical orthodoxy on sanctification and other areas of Christianity is restored, when literal hermeneutics are reinstated and their implications rigorously applied.
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Old 11-30-2018, 04:21 PM   #29
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do you know who wrote this? What is their agenda?
They don't like the Keswick Convention for sure. . .it was hard to tell . . . they were talking about modalism and deification; Pentecostalism and holiness/sanctification. I'd been looking for info on Elizabeth Fischbacher and Watchman Nee; they'd gone together to Keswick and she translated his talks, there. So they were more than passing acquaintances - they were at least for a while co-workers and peers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Watchman Nee - The Overcoming Life
In Chefoo I learned a lesson. One day Miss Fischbacher and I were praying for definite gifts from God. I was praying for the gift of faith, while she was praying for the gift of healing. After we prayed for a quarter of an hour, both of us received the gifts. In the evening we went to the meeting, and Sister An told me that another sister living downstairs in the meeting place was going out of her mind... The next day I invited Miss Fischbacher to come with me to see the sick sister. Of course, I could have gone alone, but Miss Fischbacher had just received the gift of healing, and I had received the gift of faith. Why should we not apply them now? When Miss Fischbacher got my invitation, she was somewhat hesitant. She said she would pray first. After she prayed, she decided to come. ….The Lord gave me faith. My faith rose up in me, and I began to praise the Lord! I knew that she was going to be healed. After Miss Fischbacher prayed, she also had faith and began to praise the Lord. Then two brothers and a sister also prayed a few words, but they were not in the flow of the Spirit as much as we were. Then the time came, and I had to take Miss Fischbacher to her boat.
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I find it amazing how the Recovery can use people, and then discard them. And vice versa. The Keswick Convention of T.A. Sparks was always held in high regard by Lee.
Keswick was held in regard in the LC because it validated Watchman Nee before Christianity. But the LSM would never endorse "Fallen Deformed Christianity" Keswick on it's own right! "Mystery Babylon" Keswick! Oh no! Funny how that works. It's always a one-way street: the My Way Highway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Woodbridge PhD Thesis on the Brethren in China
Most of the duration of Nee’s second trip to Britain was spent at the Honor Oak Fellowship Centre of Theodore Austin-Sparks. Formed in 1925, Honor Oak hosted regular church meetings, but also formed a larger operation that included residential conferences and regular publications. Nee had been introduced to Austin-Sparks’ writings by Margaret Barber, and he had subsequently befriended a CIM missionary, Elizabeth Fischbacher, who had been part of the Honor Oak Fellowship before becoming a missionary. Fischbacher resigned from the CIM in 1935 and became associated with the Little Flock. It was she who had suggested that Nee accompany her and a group of missionaries to Britain in 1938.
In the LC we respected Keswick because it validated Nee and by extension was one of our bona fides of Christian spirituality. But we didn't want to know too much about Keswick, because then, someone might start asking questions about Elizabeth Fischbacher and egalitarianism. Besides, it's Mystery Babylon.
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Old 01-01-2019, 12:32 PM   #30
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Thanks for sharing this link Aron. Though I don’t agree with the author’s hard line Baptist position, there is so much in this article that simply cannot be ignored, it is a scathing indictment of Nee, Lee, Pentecostalism and how they all were the fruit of the “Keswick Revival”.

Quote:
Pentecostalism was the true child and heir of the Welsh holiness revival work of Evan Roberts. It is historically certain that the “world-wide . . . Pentecostal . . . revival was rocked in the cradle of little Wales . . . becoming full grown in Los Angeles.”[927]
Quote:
The abominable heresies of Watchman Nee and Witness Lee illustrate where the Keswick continuationism can lead—their cult is Keswick theology gone to seed. The rejection of grammatical-historical exegesis and literal interpretation for mystical and experiential hermeneutics fundamentally undergirds Keswick, Pentecostal, and Church of the Recovery doctrine; all these movements fall away, and classical orthodoxy on sanctification and other areas of Christianity is restored, when literal hermeneutics are reinstated and their implications rigorously applied.
There is also much about the error of Jesse Penn-Lewis and her influence on Nee. I always thought there was something peculiar about the arrangement between Jesse Penn-Lewis and Evan Roberts, this piece gives some more background information on it. I think this may also explain the split between Penn-Lewis and T.A. Sparks, though Sparks (to my knowledge) never went into detail about the split, perhaps he discerned that there was error in her teaching and began to distance himself.
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Old 01-01-2019, 03:54 PM   #31
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Default Re: Egalitarianism Vs. Complementarianism

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Though I don’t agree with the author’s hard line Baptist position, there is so much in this article that simply cannot be ignored, it is a scathing indictment of Nee, Lee, Pentecostalism and how they all were the fruit of the “Keswick Revival”. .
Hard line Baptist dogmatism is not a savory stew for sure. Yet if Martin Luther "recovered" anything about justification by faith, we shouldn't casually dismiss the Baptist critique, either. In short, it seems the "holiness" movement suggests a "second level" of Christian experience, and this is what the Baptists object to. In my case, having gone from Baptist to LC and back, I can see it from both sides. I was drawn to the Charismatic Experience, as superior to hearing the gospel preached every Sunday morning. "Repent or face damnation" every week does get old.

But on the other hand, the "next level" Christianity becomes a moving target; Lee introduced the Vital Groups concept because we weren't vital enough. Said who? Said Lee. So he had a fulcrum to manipulate us. When we were in a heightened state of subjectivity (shouting, repetitive chanting, rocking back and forth) we were under the thumb of Lee. He could suggest anything. We competed to see who could shout AAAYYYEE-MEN! loudest.

But if the topic is women's role in the Church, the influence of women on Nee can't be dismissed. And yet his movement does indeed dismiss them. Go figure.
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